L3 Exam


The Level-3 competency exam is intended to test basic, fundamental concepts that every chemical engineering student graduating from BYU should understand. All students must pass this exam during the senior year, and each student may make three attempts to pass the exam. The attempts for the 2017-2018 academic year are scheduled as follows:

First attempt: Tues, Sep 5, 2017 - Sat, Oct 14, 2017
Second attempt: Mon, Oct 23, 2017 - Tues, Nov 21, 2017
Third attempt: Mon, Jan 8, 2018 - Sat, Jan 27, 2018

Level 3 Exam Competencies

Competency Number Expectation Level Usage
3.1.1.1 Students will be able to perform unit conversions. 3 M
10.1.1 Students will be able to use the design equations for ideal reactors to determine reactor volume, feed flow rate, or conversion. 3 M
3.1.2.1 Students will be able to solve steady-state material balances for non-reacting, single-unit systems. 3 M
3.2.1 Students will be able to identify equilibrium phases on either PT or PV projections of the PVT surface, and be able to obtain vapor pressures for pure components for a given temperature. 3 M
10.2.1.1 Students will be able to do preliminary size and performance calculations on shell-and tube heat exchangers using the log-mean temperature difference method. 3 M
3.3.1 Students will be able to solve the mechanical energy balance for frictionless flow with and without shaft work. 3 M
3.4.1 Students will: (1) be able to assign appropriate modes of heat transfer to a given physical scenario; (2) know (from memory) Newton's law of cooling; and (3) understand and be able to use Fourier's law (one dimensional) and Newton's law of cooling. 3 M
3.4.2 Students will understand conduction and convection resistances, and be able to quantitatively use q = (Delta T)/(Sum Res) and q = UA(Delta T)_lm. 3 M
10.4.2 Students will be able to use Raoult's Law and vapor pressure correlations to solve the VLE and mass balances associated with a single-stage isothermal flash. (Adiabatic flames are considered level 2.) 3 M
3.4.3.1 Students will understand q = hA(Delta T) and how h is qualitatively related to Nu, Re, and Pr, and how to obtain a value for h - qualitative problem. 3 M
3.5.1 Students will understand Fick's law and the contributions to the flux arising from a driving force and from convection. 3 M
3.5.2 Students will be able to use the heat/mass transfer analogy to estimate mass transfer coefficients. 3 M
3.6.1.1 Students will understand and be able to use definitions of rate and nth-order rate expressions. They will know how to determine n from basic rate data. 3 M
3.7.1.1 Students will be able to solve steady-state, first law problems with open, non-reacting, single-process units (e.g., compressors, valves, heat exchangers). 3 M
3.7.2 Students will be able to solve bubble and dew point problems assuming Raoult's Law behavior. 3 M
3.7.3 Students will know how Delta G is related to equilibrium constants and will be able to calculate an equilibrium constant (from Delta Go) at 298 K and relate equilibrium constants to the extent of reaction for ideal gas phase reactions. 3 M
3.3.2 Students will be able to (1) describe qualitatively the physical significance of viscosity in terms of fluid behavior; (2) define and describe the physical significance of Re; (3) describe flow regimes that correspond to different values of Re. 3 M
10.3.1 Students will be able to determine the power required for a pump to deliver a specified flow rate of an incompressible fluid through a single pipeline (excludes flow in parallel lengths) consisting of pipe (multiple diameters acceptable), valves, and fittings. 3 M
3.1.1.2 Students will be able to ensure dimensional consistency when evaluating equations. 3 M
3.1.2.2 Students will be able to solve steady-state energy balances for single-unit, isothermal, reacting systems. 3 M
3.1.2.3 Students will be able to solve steady-state material balances for single-unit, reacting systems. 3 M
3.4.3.2 Students will understand q = hA(Delta T) and how h is qualitatively related to Nu, Re, and Pr, and how to obtain a value for h - quantitative problem. 3 M
3.6.1.2 Students will understand and be able to use definitions of rate, nth-order rate expressions, and the Arrhenius temperature dependence k = Aexp(-E/RT). They will know how to determine E from basic rate data. 3 M
3.7.1.2 Students will be able to solve first-law problems with single process units for closed systems. 3 M

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